Dissociative Disorders

 

 

A disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception.

 

 

Dissociative Amnesia is characterized by and inability to recall important personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature, that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

 

Dissociative Fugue is characterized by sudden, unexpected travel away from home or one’s customary place of work, accompanied by an inability to recall one’s past and confusion about personal identity, or the assumption of a new identity.

 

Dissociative Identity Disorder is characterized by the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states that recurrently take control of the individual’s behavior, accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

 

 

 

 

Depersonalization Disorder is characterized by a persistent or recurrent feeling of being detached from one’s mental processes or body that is accompanied by intact reality testing.

 

Dissociative Disorder not otherwise specified is included for coding disorders in which the predominant feature is Dissociative symptoms, but do not meet the criteria of any specific Dissociative disorder.

 

 

 

Random Comments

 

Dissociative states are relatively common and usually not pathological (daydreaming, sleep, religious ceremonies,  “speaking in tongues”, meditation, “losing” part of a conversation, hypnosis, etc.)

 

Dissociative states are very culture bound (running “amok” in Malaysia is not pathological, being hypnotized is not in this culture).

 

The disorder is highly associated with suggestibility in people.

 

Most Dissociative states are temporary and last only hours or a few days (excluding dissociative identity disorder).

 

 

Treatment of Dissociative Disorders

 

Dissociative Amnesia and Fugue

  1. evaluate patients (look for traumatic or highly stressful events)
  2. Provide discussion, support, and persuasion. Suggest that memory will gradually return.
  3. Encourage them to talk freely of recent events, look for lost memories.
  4. Employ free association as a technique
  5. Hypnosis
  6. Amytal interview.
  7. Consider neurologic causes (TBI, etc.).

Dissociative Identity Disorder

  1. Refer to someone else.

Dissociative Disorders

 

 

A disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception.

 

 

Dissociative Amnesia is characterized by and inability to recall important personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature, that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

 

Dissociative Fugue is characterized by sudden, unexpected travel away from home or one’s customary place of work, accompanied by an inability to recall one’s past and confusion about personal identity, or the assumption of a new identity.

 

Dissociative Identity Disorder is characterized by the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states that recurrently take control of the individual’s behavior, accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.

 

 

 

 

Depersonalization Disorder is characterized by a persistent or recurrent feeling of being detached from one’s mental processes or body that is accompanied by intact reality testing.

 

Dissociative Disorder not otherwise specified is included for coding disorders in which the predominant feature is Dissociative symptoms, but do not meet the criteria of any specific Dissociative disorder.

 

 

 

Random Comments

 

Dissociative states are relatively common and usually not pathological (daydreaming, sleep, religious ceremonies,  “speaking in tongues”, meditation, “losing” part of a conversation, hypnosis, etc.)

 

Dissociative states are very culture bound (running “amok” in Malaysia is not pathological, being hypnotized is not in this culture).

 

The disorder is highly associated with suggestibility in people.

 

Most Dissociative states are temporary and last only hours or a few days (excluding dissociative identity disorder).

 

 

Treatment of Dissociative Disorders

 

Dissociative Amnesia and Fugue

  1. evaluate patients (look for traumatic or highly stressful events)
  2. Provide discussion, support, and persuasion. Suggest that memory will gradually return.
  3. Encourage them to talk freely of recent events, look for lost memories.
  4. Employ free association as a technique
  5. Hypnosis
  6. Amytal interview.
  7. Consider neurologic causes (TBI, etc.).

Dissociative Identity Disorder

  1. Refer to someone else.

 

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